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Surface-Mounted Power Transistor and Heatsink

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060853D
Original Publication Date: 1986-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Joy, EF: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a technique which permits the surface mounting of a power transistor or rectifier and aheatsink to a printed circuit (PC) board without the need of special hardware. The present technique is illustrated in the drawings. Fig. 1 is an exploded perspective view of the parts for mounting on the PC board, and Fig. 2 is view of the parts assembled on the PC board. Transistor leads 2 are reformed so that they will rest on lands 5 of the PC board. Heatsink clip 4 is snapped over heatsink 3 and held in place by notches 6. Transistor 1 and its insulator (not shown) are inserted between clip 4 and the heatsink. The transistor and heatsink assembly then is inserted into the PC board. Notches 7 on clip 4 engage the board to hold the assembly in place. A variation in the structure and technique is shown in Figs.

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Surface-Mounted Power Transistor and Heatsink

This article describes a technique which permits the surface mounting of a power transistor or rectifier and aheatsink to a printed circuit (PC) board without the need of special hardware. The present technique is illustrated in the drawings. Fig. 1 is an exploded perspective view of the parts for mounting on the PC board, and Fig. 2 is view of the parts assembled on the PC board. Transistor leads 2 are reformed so that they will rest on lands 5 of the PC board. Heatsink clip 4 is snapped over heatsink 3 and held in place by notches 6. Transistor 1 and its insulator (not shown) are inserted between clip 4 and the heatsink. The transistor and heatsink assembly then is inserted into the PC board. Notches 7 on clip 4 engage the board to hold the assembly in place. A variation in the structure and technique is shown in Figs. 3 and 4. The same method is used to secure the transistor 1 between clip 4 and a heatsink 8, as shown in Figs. 1 and
2. This allows heatsink 8 to be fastened to a sheet metal chassis by a fastening screw, thus dissipating the heat into the chassis as well as the heatsink. The heatsink is also used as a support and spacer for the PC board.

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