Browse Prior Art Database

Spring-Loaded File Rails

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060860D
Original Publication Date: 1986-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Habermehl, RW: AUTHOR

Abstract

An arrangement is described which eliminates looseness of disk file mechanical fits to a computer enclosure. A standard way of packaging the files to the computer enclosure is shown in Fig. 1. Rails are attached to the disk/diskette drive, and this assembly then slides into mating tracks which are attached to some kind of housing or base enclosure. To allow for robotic assembly, a spring wire latch that snaps over the end of the rail after insertion of the drives into the tracks was added to the method described above. No screws are required to lock the file into the machine. While this method captures the files, the tolerances required to manufacture the various parts could allow the drive to be loose within the tracks and the spring wire latch. Figs.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 80% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Spring-Loaded File Rails

An arrangement is described which eliminates looseness of disk file mechanical fits to a computer enclosure. A standard way of packaging the files to the computer enclosure is shown in Fig. 1. Rails are attached to the disk/diskette drive, and this assembly then slides into mating tracks which are attached to some kind of housing or base enclosure. To allow for robotic assembly, a spring wire latch that snaps over the end of the rail after insertion of the drives into the tracks was added to the method described above. No screws are required to lock the file into the machine. While this method captures the files, the tolerances required to manufacture the various parts could allow the drive to be loose within the tracks and the spring wire latch. Figs. 2 and 3A-3C illustrate a molded plastic rail which has flexible surfaces that conform to the track and latch. This conforming is due to spring-loaded arms and surfaces that pre-load the drives such that the apparent looseness between the tracks and rails is removed. To eliminate looseness in the "Z" direction as shown in Fig. 2, the rail has a slot molded at the stop end of the rail. This slot provides a spring-like bumper that deflects and allows the spring wire latch to move over the end of the rail. The deflection of the bumper is equal to the maximum looseness or clearance between the track, latch, and rail. The nose of the stop end prevents excessive movement that could overstress the...