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Sequencing System for a Stepper Motor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060890D
Original Publication Date: 1986-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Albaugh, VA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method is described for generating a cyclical sequence of control signals for a stepper motor. The data for the sequence is stored in a table so that the current state of the stepper motor is used as the address for the next state. Assume that the desired stepping sequence for a four-phase stepper motor is as set forth in Column 1 in the table of Fig.1. Assume further that the sequence is cyclical and reversible. Column 2 represents the HEX value of the binary signal supplied to the stepper motor driving circuit. Columns 1 and 2 are referred to as "states" of the stepping sequence. Columns 3, 4, and 5 together represent a data table, where Column 3 is the address of the location containing the pair of HEX characters in Columns 4 and 5.

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Sequencing System for a Stepper Motor

A method is described for generating a cyclical sequence of control signals for a stepper motor. The data for the sequence is stored in a table so that the current state of the stepper motor is used as the address for the next state. Assume that the desired stepping sequence for a four-phase stepper motor is as set forth in Column 1 in the table of Fig.1. Assume further that the sequence is cyclical and reversible. Column 2 represents the HEX value of the binary signal supplied to the stepper motor driving circuit. Columns 1 and 2 are referred to as "states" of the stepping sequence. Columns 3, 4, and 5 together represent a data table, where Column 3 is the address of the location containing the pair of HEX characters in Columns 4 and 5. When the stepper motor is at state 7, for example, the next state in the forward direction is state 6 and, in the reverse direction, it is state 5. By storing the value of these next states 5 and 6 in Columns 4 and 5 of the table at an address corresponding to the current state 7, the signals for the next state can be read directly from the table, assuming, of course, that the desired stepping direction is known. Table 1 comprises only 10 addressable locations, two (3 and 7) of which locations, are not used. If desired, the table could include 16 locations in which case the HEX value of the current state would translate directly into the table address, but would result in 8 unused locations....