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Thermal Transfer Ink With Heat-Degradable Sugar

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060909D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Findlay, HT: AUTHOR

Abstract

Thermal transfer inks which flow under heat to effect printing are enhanced with a sugar which degrades at the printing temperatures. The carbon dioxide and water given off physically promote flow of the ink, and the burned product is compatible in color with a dark ink. Typically a thermal transfer ink is a body of thermoplastic wax or resin or blend of thermoplastic resins filled with carbon black as a pigment to provide the desired dark color. The ink is supported on a substrate which is heated. In resistive ribbon thermal printing, the substrate receives electrical current and the heat is produced in the substrate. Sugar is dispersed thoroughly through the ink in small amounts relative to the other body and the pigment. Typical sugars are sucrose, fructose, lactose, and maltose.

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Thermal Transfer Ink With Heat-Degradable Sugar

Thermal transfer inks which flow under heat to effect printing are enhanced with a sugar which degrades at the printing temperatures. The carbon dioxide and water given off physically promote flow of the ink, and the burned product is compatible in color with a dark ink. Typically a thermal transfer ink is a body of thermoplastic wax or resin or blend of thermoplastic resins filled with carbon black as a pigment to provide the desired dark color. The ink is supported on a substrate which is heated. In resistive ribbon thermal printing, the substrate receives electrical current and the heat is produced in the substrate. Sugar is dispersed thoroughly through the ink in small amounts relative to the other body and the pigment. Typical sugars are sucrose, fructose, lactose, and maltose. The sugar breaks down under the heat of printing. Water and carbon dioxide are produced with energy which improves ink flow. Expansion of ink in the heated area by the release of gasses increases contact with a paper being printed upon. Carbonizing of the sugar leaves a black carbon residue which adds to blackness of the printing. These effects enhance printing. This is evident in resistive ribbon printing where a 10% or more reduction in required print current can be observed in a typical system in which the sugar is added to the ink. A representative ribbon is disclosed in U.S. Patent 4,384,797. That is a polycarbonate substrated resis...