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Process for Selective Removal of Impurities From Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060937D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clark, GJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

It has been discovered that plasma processing may be used to extract impurities from substrate materials. The incorporation of gaseous elements in deposited films either during deposition or due to post deposition heat treatment can account for many of the observed material properties. Some of the effects are beneficial and some are detrimental to the device behavior with which they are associated. Examples of the species incorporated in films are: H, O, C, F, Cl, Ar, etc. The correlation between the content of a species and material property is sometimes readily made when the species is detectable. However, detection of elements with a low atomic number is difficult and few approaches are available for obtaining a lateral or depth profile. This is particularly true for hydrogen.

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Process for Selective Removal of Impurities From Films

It has been discovered that plasma processing may be used to extract impurities from substrate materials. The incorporation of gaseous elements in deposited films either during deposition or due to post deposition heat treatment can account for many of the observed material properties. Some of the effects are beneficial and some are detrimental to the device behavior with which they are associated. Examples of the species incorporated in films are: H, O, C, F, Cl, Ar, etc. The correlation between the content of a species and material property is sometimes readily made when the species is detectable. However, detection of elements with a low atomic number is difficult and few approaches are available for obtaining a lateral or depth profile. This is particularly true for hydrogen. Because of this, the presence of hydrogen has been largely ignored and correlation of hydrogen content to material behavior has frequently been missed. During a recent investigation of the hydrogen content in thin films using the nuclear resonant reaction method, surprisingly large amounts of hydrogen were discovered with a wide variation in concentration with respect to film depth. It was discovered further that the gas content and its distribution can be controlled and selectively removed by plasma processing. Accordingly, we propose to extract species from materials by energetic particle bombardment, chemical reaction, and subsequent removal by particle bombardment. The movement of species is counter to its apparent thermodynamically stable state, but the chemical driving force and surface reaction appears to dominate, allowing the disclosed extraction proces...