Browse Prior Art Database

Portable Emulation Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060939D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carlson, SA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

During the development of a microprocessor-based intelligent disk controller using a microprocessor, there was a need for a portable emulation device that was not dependent on a host system. The circuit described in this article provides a method for downloading code without the host system and makes the emulator a true standalone device. This technique allows code to be loaded using only an emulation tool by removing its dependency on a host-development system. The code to be emulated is downloaded from erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM) into the emulator with the use of a simple circuit. Intel supplies the ICE-49 (In-Circuit-Emulator-8049) and the HSE- 49 (High-Speed-Emulator-8049); however, they are not designed to be independent of the host system.

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Portable Emulation Tool

During the development of a microprocessor-based intelligent disk controller using a microprocessor, there was a need for a portable emulation device that was not dependent on a host system. The circuit described in this article provides a method for downloading code without the host system and makes the emulator a true standalone device. This technique allows code to be loaded using only an emulation tool by removing its dependency on a host-development system. The code to be emulated is downloaded from erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM) into the emulator with the use of a simple circuit. Intel supplies the ICE-49 (In-Circuit-Emulator-8049) and the HSE- 49 (High-Speed-Emulator- 8049); however, they are not designed to be independent of the host system. The ICE-49 is designed as an internal card within the host system, but the HSE- 49 is physically much smaller and sits outside the system and requires the system only to download the code to be emulated. It has a two-microprocessor circuit assembly: one to emulate a microprocessor through a cable and connector with random-access memory (RAM) for instruction storage and the other to provide data input through a 33-key panel and control functions such as examining/changing memory/registers or setting breakpoints. The emulator board was sufficient for all hardware and software debug. With the modified HSE-49, it was possible to go to the location of a development machine and use the emulator to troubleshoot the problem. For locating a particular problem, the emulator would be plugg...