Browse Prior Art Database

Inert Ion-Implanted Schottky Barrier Diode Compatible With Hot Processing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060952D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bergeron, DL: AUTHOR

Abstract

An argon ion implantation is used to form Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) which have desirable characteristics after having been exposed to hot processing, e.g., 925 degrees Celsius in an oxidizing environment. The process described in "Inert Ion-Implanted Schottky Barrier Diode" by D. L. Bergeron in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin 25, 1805 (September 1982) could not be used in processes where high temperature thermal oxidation is used after the device formation. The process described here is performed prior to thermal oxide processing and has been demonstrated to be tolerant of a 925 degrees Celsius oxidation step.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 68% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Inert Ion-Implanted Schottky Barrier Diode Compatible With Hot Processing

An argon ion implantation is used to form Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) which have desirable characteristics after having been exposed to hot processing, e.g., 925 degrees Celsius in an oxidizing environment. The process described in "Inert Ion-Implanted Schottky Barrier Diode" by D. L. Bergeron in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin 25, 1805 (September 1982) could not be used in processes where high temperature thermal oxidation is used after the device formation. The process described here is performed prior to thermal oxide processing and has been demonstrated to be tolerant of a 925 degrees Celsius oxidation step. Referring to the figure, the process is as follows: After NPN emitter diffusion, or implant and anneal, SBD contacts are etched open to the N- epitaxial silicon 8 (holes are etched through the silicon nitride 4 and the SiO2 layer 6). Resist screen oxide is then grown on the N- epitaxial silicon. A block-out photoresist mask 2 is created over the silicon nitride layer 4, exposing only the SBD contact regions. One such representative region is shown in the diagram and is shown in the condition which follows removal of the screen oxide at the SBD contacts by an etch step. A high dose (3x1015 ions/cm2), high energy (50 to 100 KeV) argon ion implant is then performed to create controlled crystal damage at the surface of the SBD contact. After stripping the photoresist mask 2, no...