Browse Prior Art Database

Air Turbulator/Resistor Card

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061002D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aakalu, NG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The illustrated structure merges resistors from several resistor modules onto a porcelain/steel substrate. This improves cooling and reduces cost. Fig. 1 shows a side view. A long narrow porcelain/steel substrate 10 carries several thick film resistors 12 on one or both sides of the substrate. Combination mounting and connector clips 14 are soldered onto the bottom edge. These clips act as pins for 10 and are wave soldered to circuit card 16. The shape of the substrate 10 is optimized to provide good cooling for the resistors 12, and also the material of the clips 14 is selected for minimum heat conduction into the card 16. The top edge 18 of the substrate 10 is designed to increase air turbulence, which in turn enhances the cooling of surrounding electronic components, and the bottom edge 20 is shaped to provide standoffs.

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Air Turbulator/Resistor Card

The illustrated structure merges resistors from several resistor modules onto a porcelain/steel substrate. This improves cooling and reduces cost. Fig. 1 shows a side view. A long narrow porcelain/steel substrate 10 carries several thick film resistors 12 on one or both sides of the substrate. Combination mounting and connector clips 14 are soldered onto the bottom edge. These clips act as pins for 10 and are wave soldered to circuit card 16. The shape of the substrate 10 is optimized to provide good cooling for the resistors 12, and also the material of the clips 14 is selected for minimum heat conduction into the card 16. The top edge 18 of the substrate 10 is designed to increase air turbulence, which in turn enhances the cooling of surrounding electronic components, and the bottom edge 20 is shaped to provide standoffs. This design makes use of the unique features of the porcelain/ steel substrate 10 to achieve excellent cooling, low cost and the air turbulator function. The steel is punched into the intricate shape, and the porcelain is coated in an electrophoresis bath. The resistors 12 and conductors 22, which connect them to the clips 14 in the final assembly, are applied with thick film process. The resistors 12 are laser trimmed to the desired value, and the clips 14 are soldered prior to epoxy encapsulation. By combining heat sink and resistor substrate into one element, it is possible to dissipate upwards of 20 watts. Also...