Browse Prior Art Database

Auto Loop on Diagnostics

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061008D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Smith, TJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Invoking a loop on diagnostics in a workstation of a computer system with only a power connection and without having any switches or keyboard for input is facilitated through a diagnostic control program resident on each workstation. The diagnostic control program takes a basic sequence flow, as set forth in the drawing. The major block is the set of POR (Power On Reset) diagnostics that execute each time the workstation is turned on. Once the tests complete, two major checks are made by the control program. The first is to see if the keyboard is attached. If it is attached, the terminal can go into its normal operation or handle other errors accordingly. If the keyboard is not attached, then the first condition for the 'Auto Loop' mode is satisfied.

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Auto Loop on Diagnostics

Invoking a loop on diagnostics in a workstation of a computer system with only a power connection and without having any switches or keyboard for input is facilitated through a diagnostic control program resident on each workstation. The diagnostic control program takes a basic sequence flow, as set forth in the drawing. The major block is the set of POR (Power On Reset) diagnostics that execute each time the workstation is turned on. Once the tests complete, two major checks are made by the control program. The first is to see if the keyboard is attached. If it is attached, the terminal can go into its normal operation or handle other errors accordingly. If the keyboard is not attached, then the first condition for the 'Auto Loop' mode is satisfied. The diagnostic control program then looks to see if the workstation ID (or station address), held in a non-volatile random-access memory (NVRAM), is valid. That is, if the ID/Address lies within the correct range and has valid, odd parity, it is considered valid. If at this time the diagnostic control program looks at the workstation ID/ Address and finds it valid, the program will return to the normal flow and handle errors appropriately. However, if the ID/Address is invalid, the second condition for the 'Auto Loop' mode is met. Control is then transferred back to the beginning of the diagnostic control program where the entire process is repeated. Therefore, whenever the following two cond...