Browse Prior Art Database

Graphic Image Stretching

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061063D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 72K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Yamakoshi, N: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

An ASCII display terminal with a 9 x 16-dot character box could emulate another terminal which supports a user defined font of 9 x 10-dot character box. To keep continuity of image patterns represented in the 9 x 10-dot character boxes, the ASCII display terminal determines if the font pattern of the 9 x 10-dot character box is a graphic image. If yes, the graphic image of the 9 x 10-dot character box is stretched to the 9 x 16-dot pattern. The size of one character box on the display surface of the ASCII display terminal could be freely defined. The right part of Fig. 1 shows one exemplary size of the character box, e.g., 9 x 16 dots. The host application program could supply font data of different size, e.g., 9 x 10 dots, from the 9 x 16 dots.

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Graphic Image Stretching

An ASCII display terminal with a 9 x 16-dot character box could emulate another terminal which supports a user defined font of 9 x 10-dot character box. To keep continuity of image patterns represented in the 9 x 10-dot character boxes, the ASCII display terminal determines if the font pattern of the 9 x 10-dot character box is a graphic image. If yes, the graphic image of the 9 x 10-dot character box is stretched to the 9 x 16-dot pattern. The size of one character box on the display surface of the ASCII display terminal could be freely defined. The right part of Fig. 1 shows one exemplary size of the character box, e.g., 9 x 16 dots. The host application program could supply font data of different size, e.g., 9 x 10 dots, from the 9 x 16 dots. Character dots are located within 7 x 7 matrix within the 9 x 10 dots, and are displayed in columns 5 through 11 on the display surface. The problem arises in the case where the 9 x 10 dots constitute a part of continuous graphic image, as shown in the left part of Fig. 2. The right part of Fig. 2 shows the part of the graphic image displayed on the display surface, and continuity of the graphic image is lost. To solve the problem, the ASCII display terminal determines if there exists a dot outside of the 7 x 7 matrix. If no, the font pattern is the character. If yes, the font pattern is the graphic image, and the ASCII display terminal vertically expands the 9 x 10 dot pattern to the 9 x 16 dot p...