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Blink Indication in Graphics Mode

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061071D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Honda, K: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In a color graphic display, characters superimposed on a graphics image can be blinked on a screen by periodically rewriting contents of palettes. As shown in the figure, a display adapter includes four all-points- addressable planes, i.e., R, G, B and Work planes. Graphics and character data are stored in the R, G and B planes. The Work plane is normally used to store some data in a graphics drawing operation. Further, the Work plane is used to store "1" bits at locations corresponding to those in the R, G and B planes wherein data for characters to be blinked are stored. Four bits B1, B2, B3 and B4 read out of the four planes designate one of sixteen palettes, i.e. Palettes #0, 1, 2 ... 15 which contain color data to determine the color of display.

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Blink Indication in Graphics Mode

In a color graphic display, characters superimposed on a graphics image can be blinked on a screen by periodically rewriting contents of palettes. As shown in the figure, a display adapter includes four all-points- addressable planes, i.e., R, G, B and Work planes. Graphics and character data are stored in the R, G and B planes. The Work plane is normally used to store some data in a graphics drawing operation. Further, the Work plane is used to store "1" bits at locations corresponding to those in the R, G and B planes wherein data for characters to be blinked are stored. Four bits B1, B2, B3 and B4 read out of the four planes designate one of sixteen palettes, i.e. Palettes #0, 1, 2 ... 15 which contain color data to determine the color of display. As for the character to be blinked, the bit B1 from the Work plane is always "1", and thus the four bits designate one of seven palettes, i.e., Palettes #9, 10 ... 15. For blinking, a controller (not shown) periodically rewrites the contents of these seven palettes by alternately using mode 1 and mode 2 color data, as indicated in the following table.

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