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Image Array Scanning Gripper

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061084D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brennemann, AE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Using a matrix of infrared detectors on one gripper face a matrix of infrared emitters on the opposing gripper face, and scanning the emitters and the detectors in a known program, permits detection of the intensity of images from objects between the gripper faces. Computer review of the scan data, on a realtime basis, can provide object position and identity. Robot gripper face 1 is equipped with an array (16 shown in 4 x 4, n x n array) of infrared emitters 2. Gripper face 3 is equipped with a similar array (16 shown in 4 x 4 array) of appropriate infrared detectors 4. Other than n x n arrays are permitted on either gripper face but at the expense of increased operational complexity. Grippers 1 and 3 are positioned by positioning mechanism 5 under control of computer 6.

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Image Array Scanning Gripper

Using a matrix of infrared detectors on one gripper face a matrix of infrared emitters on the opposing gripper face, and scanning the emitters and the detectors in a known program, permits detection of the intensity of images from objects between the gripper faces. Computer review of the scan data, on a realtime basis, can provide object position and identity. Robot gripper face 1 is equipped with an array (16 shown in 4 x 4, n x n array) of infrared emitters 2. Gripper face 3 is equipped with a similar array (16 shown in 4 x 4 array) of appropriate infrared detectors 4. Other than n x n arrays are permitted on either gripper face but at the expense of increased operational complexity. Grippers 1 and 3 are positioned by positioning mechanism 5 under control of computer 6. When it is desired to ascertain the characteristics of object 7 (identity, position, orientation, shape, etc.) computer 6 controls a scan of emitters 2 in a known pattern (selective, random or a raster scan). Object 7 shades varying patterns of detectors 4 as the various emitters are turned on and off. Computer 6 monitors the shadow patterns against calculated or supplied parameter patterns to determine the identity, position or other characteristics of object 7, and to control the gripper position accordingly. Selective or random scanning provides faster image acquisition than raster scanning. Greater precision may be obtained by increasing array size (10 x 10, 10 x...