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Removal of Chloride From Perchloroethylene Using Activated Carbon

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061104D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dufort, J: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Perchloroethylene inhibited with diallylamine is useful as a cleaning solvent. However, perchloroethylene is a chlorinated unsaturated hydrocarbon that tends to decompose to form free hydrogen chloride. The presence of diallylamine does not completely prevent this tendency. It has been found that the chloride can be effectively removed from the perchloroethylene by passing the perchloroethylene through a column of activated carbon. In the figure, two stainless steel columns 7 and 8 are filled with activated carbon 9. An activated carbon which was found acceptable had the following characteristics: Total Surface Area 700 m /gr. Bulk Density 500 gr./lit.

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Removal of Chloride From Perchloroethylene Using Activated Carbon

Perchloroethylene inhibited with diallylamine is useful as a cleaning solvent. However, perchloroethylene is a chlorinated unsaturated hydrocarbon that tends to decompose to form free hydrogen chloride. The presence of diallylamine does not completely prevent this tendency. It has been found that the chloride can be effectively removed from the perchloroethylene by passing the perchloroethylene through a column of activated carbon. In the figure, two stainless steel columns 7 and 8 are filled with activated carbon 9. An activated carbon which was found acceptable had the following characteristics: Total Surface Area 700 m /gr. Bulk Density 500 gr./lit. Particle Diameter 2 mm Moisture Content 5% Ball Pan Hardness (ASTM) 99% Ignition Point 250OEC The activated carbon 9 is dried by a flow of heated nitrogen gas through the columns 7 and 8. The perchloroethylene is heated to a temperature of approximately 80OEC and pumped through the columns 7 and 8 and through a 5-micron filter 10 to a clean tank for reuse. Although the process removes chloride even when the perchloroethylene is maintained at a lower temperature, much more successful results were achieved by raising the temperature of the perchloroethylene to the 80OEC range.

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