Browse Prior Art Database

Disk Spindle Storage and Transit Lock

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061172D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brew, TP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In a disk file, a brake or lock is required to prevent uncontrolled disk rotation during storage or transit to eliminate disk surface damage. This locking device consists of a spring-mounted elastomer brake pad manually engageable with a dimpled annular surface provided on the rotor of the disk drive motor. Figs. 1 and 2 illustrate the brake in plan and side views, respectively. An annular cap 1 is rigidly fixed to the rotor of the disk drive motor. The lower surface 2 of cap 1 carries numerous smooth topped conical projections 3 to provide an interlocking surface. Brake pad 4 is attached to shaped spring 5 rigidly fixed to base casting 6 so its surface is adjacent to conical projections 3. The brake is manually applied by means of a lever 7 which pivots about point 8.

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Disk Spindle Storage and Transit Lock

In a disk file, a brake or lock is required to prevent uncontrolled disk rotation during storage or transit to eliminate disk surface damage. This locking device consists of a spring-mounted elastomer brake pad manually engageable with a dimpled annular surface provided on the rotor of the disk drive motor. Figs. 1 and 2 illustrate the brake in plan and side views, respectively. An annular cap 1 is rigidly fixed to the rotor of the disk drive motor. The lower surface 2 of cap 1 carries numerous smooth topped conical projections 3 to provide an interlocking surface. Brake pad 4 is attached to shaped spring 5 rigidly fixed to base casting 6 so its surface is adjacent to conical projections 3. The brake is manually applied by means of a lever 7 which pivots about point 8. This causes camming edge 9 of lever 7 to engage the sloping surface 10 of the spring and raise it to clamp pad 4 against cap 1. The lever 7, which may be a bell-crank, is acted on by an over-center spring (not shown) to maintain the brake applied. The arrangement illustrated takes very little vertical space, requires only low axial forces and suffers little or no backlash. Brake pad 4 is made from an elastomer chosen for toughness and ability to recover after deformation by projections 3, and is of minimum thickness to minimize shear movement when the brake is applied.

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