Browse Prior Art Database

User-Definable Keyboard

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061181D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Finnes, SJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Each character on a keyboard is assigned a unique scancode independent of its position on the keyboard. The keyboard is constructed so that the user or field engineer may rearrange the keys by removing a key or key top from one key position and placing it at another. The key produces the same scancode regardless of its position. This allows rearrangement of keys without any software support. The keyboard contains an array of pads with one pad corresponding to each key position. Each key position in the keyboard has a pad identical to the pad at any other position. Each pad comprises a multiplicity of contact points or switches.

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User-Definable Keyboard

Each character on a keyboard is assigned a unique scancode independent of its position on the keyboard. The keyboard is constructed so that the user or field engineer may rearrange the keys by removing a key or key top from one key position and placing it at another. The key produces the same scancode regardless of its position. This allows rearrangement of keys without any software support. The keyboard contains an array of pads with one pad corresponding to each key position. Each key position in the keyboard has a pad identical to the pad at any other position. Each pad comprises a multiplicity of contact points or switches. The information about which key is at a particular key position is contained in a corresponding mask which, by causing certain contact points in the particular pad to be grounded or certain switches in the pad to be closed, creates a pattern of '1s' and '0s' unique to that particular key. By placing a certain mask at a certain pad position a particular key may be placed at that corresponding key position. Contact points in a particular field pad are selected by shorting selected points in the pad. This requires field changeable 'shorting masks'. The user or field engineer would select a 'shorting' mask unique to the desired character and install it at the proper location. Ideally the shorting mask would be contained in a key cap which a user could easily replace. Practically, the individualization may occur by remov...