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Method for Assembling a Multilayer Planar Object

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061200D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Davis, CF: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method is described for assembling a multilayer planar object, such as a circuit board. The arrangement relies on a combination of four key items. 1) A carrier plane (or two) called a core shown in Fig. 1 with locating slots 10. Four slots are required for best location, although only three slots may be used for planar location which is to be fixed. 2) A set of three unique plunger-tapered pins 11 shown in Fig. 2 are the locating devices. These pins 11 are suspended on leaf springs 12 or sheet metal and will exhibit zero backlash in the slots and provide excellent repeatability and non-stick reliability, requiring no maintenance. 3)

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Method for Assembling a Multilayer Planar Object

A method is described for assembling a multilayer planar object, such as a circuit board. The arrangement relies on a combination of four key items. 1) A carrier plane (or two) called a core shown in Fig. 1 with locating slots 10. Four slots are required for best location, although only three slots may be used for planar location which is to be fixed. 2) A set of three unique plunger-tapered pins 11 shown in Fig. 2 are the locating devices. These pins 11 are suspended on leaf springs 12 or sheet metal and will exhibit zero backlash in the slots and provide excellent repeatability and non-stick reliability, requiring no maintenance. 3)

A magnifying viewing system, for each of the four slots, and associated illuminators may also be provided. 4) Tooling "tic marks" or "line reticles" are intended to align with the four slots and are centered when the tool and the core are perfectly aligned. This, when viewed, provides high visual sensitivity due to the differential window, or, if sensed with photo-optical devices, also acts differentially using the balanced bridge servo concept approach for locating tooling. The plunger-locating pins facilitate automatic feed devices, each pin locating precisely in one axis. The bullet nose requires only that the core be casually located in a work bed. The tapered pins precisely and positively locate the core when the pins are extended. The carrier core remains the sole locating and registration checking device for subsequently added layers of build-up, always aligning the appropriate tooling to the four slots. The four slots, each pair of two providing centerline location with precision, split all errors due to dimensional instabilities. The use of the improved method involves the following steps: 1. A carrier core may be a sheet of conductive foil (or a laminate consisting of two foils separated by an insulative web of resin-impregnate...