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Hierarchical Organization in an Array Structure

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061244D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rodriguez, JR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Three techniques are described in providing the control structure of hierarchical top-down design. Discussed first is the linking of component control modules, second the design of a control interface for high level logic design, and third the functional partitioning of the control logic in a bus-to-bus translator. Component control modules are linked together in a hierarchical organization to allow for the application of algorithm state machines (ASMs) to functions that are not totally made up of mutually exclusive events. The method is effective in systems that have a multiplicity of mutually asynchronous functions. This is done by linking the control modules in a hierarchical organization, as shown in Fig. 1. An example of the described technique is shown by following the implementation.

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Hierarchical Organization in an Array Structure

Three techniques are described in providing the control structure of hierarchical top-down design. Discussed first is the linking of component control modules, second the design of a control interface for high level logic design, and third the functional partitioning of the control logic in a bus-to-bus translator. Component control modules are linked together in a hierarchical organization to allow for the application of algorithm state machines (ASMs) to functions that are not totally made up of mutually exclusive events. The method is effective in systems that have a multiplicity of mutually asynchronous functions. This is done by linking the control modules in a hierarchical organization, as shown in Fig. 1. An example of the described technique is shown by following the implementation. The service group supervisor 10 provides the controls to the service group made up of the DPC (Direct Program Control) controller 11, cycle steal controller 12, and interrupt controller 13 so that only one controller is active at any one time. The DPC sequencer controls the program sequences so that separate ASMs are able to handle other individual sequences of the service group lines. The ASMs are linked together, and the supervisor provides the proper arbitration for the selection of service group operations. The polling controller 14 allows the linking of mutually asynchronous systems that are interdependent. Polling is conducted asynchronously to the service group operations. However, interrupt and cycle steal cannot occur until after the polling sequence is complete. Polling for interrupt and cycle steal, being similar, is combined into one ASM, including arbitration. When polling is acknowledged, the service group handles the actual sequence while t...