Browse Prior Art Database

Automated Thermally Conductive Module Pin Inspection Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061278D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Miller, RF: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes an electromechanical system for handling and holding thermally conductive module (TCM) pins for inspection wherein five pins per second are processed. In the manufacturing process of a TCM substrate many expensive repairs have been required because of the failure of the pins to meet mechanical specifications. Therefore, a system of determining the integrity of the pins prior to bonding to the substrate needed to be developed. The handling system disclosed herein delivers pins to an optical measuring and inspection system at a rate of five per second. Referring to the drawings, Fig. 1 is a top view of the present handling mechanism. Fig. 2 is an end view, and Fig. 3 is a front view.

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Automated Thermally Conductive Module Pin Inspection Tool

This article describes an electromechanical system for handling and holding thermally conductive module (TCM) pins for inspection wherein five pins per second are processed. In the manufacturing process of a TCM substrate many expensive repairs have been required because of the failure of the pins to meet mechanical specifications. Therefore, a system of determining the integrity of the pins prior to bonding to the substrate needed to be developed. The handling system disclosed herein delivers pins to an optical measuring and inspection system at a rate of five per second. Referring to the drawings, Fig. 1 is a top view of the present handling mechanism. Fig. 2 is an end view, and Fig. 3 is a front view. The mechanism includes a vibratory feed bowl (not shown) and a linear feeder system for pin orientation and transfer to a rotating disc 2 with slots 3 on the side to receive the pins hanging on their heads. The pins are driven into the slots from the linear feeder, shown in detail in Fig. 5, to disc 2 and held by means of a vacuum port 4 centrally located to the slot. The pins are then carried around with the disc to a transfer point, shown in detail in Fig. 4. At this point the disc rotates past the vacuum supply holding the pin in place and allows the pin to be magnetically transferred to disc 5 standing on its head and positioned for inspection. Disc 5 has 160 magnets (.090 inch in diameter) located rad...