Browse Prior Art Database

Touch-Sensitive Overlay With Tactile Feedback

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061287D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ames, RN: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

This article describes a touch-sensitive screen which provides tactile feedback without adverse refraction/distortion. The design utilizes a display overlay with integral push buttons which have the feel of conventional switches. Touch-sensitive screens are increasingly important as an input mechanism to digital computers. One of the limitations for most systems is that the finger actuating a switch (or other action) hits the hard surface of a display (CRT, EL panel, etc.) and does not provide physical feedback. Audible feedback is generally used, but physical feedback now is considered extremely important. The arrangement disclosed herein provides the desired tactile feedback.

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Touch-Sensitive Overlay With Tactile Feedback

This article describes a touch-sensitive screen which provides tactile feedback without adverse refraction/distortion. The design utilizes a display overlay with integral push buttons which have the feel of conventional switches. Touch- sensitive screens are increasingly important as an input mechanism to digital computers. One of the limitations for most systems is that the finger actuating a switch (or other action) hits the hard surface of a display (CRT, EL panel, etc.) and does not provide physical feedback. Audible feedback is generally used, but physical feedback now is considered extremely important. The arrangement disclosed herein provides the desired tactile feedback. It also provides a transparent display screen cover that can be anti-reflective or provide other filter advantage and does not introduce significant refractive distortion. Variations of this design can be applied to different technologies. However, the description herein is applicable directly to conductive touch panels. Figs. 1A, 1B, and 1C illustrate the concept which involves installing a MYLAR* (or equivalent) overlay top for the display and touch-sensitive mechanism. Fig. 1A is a top view of the display area. An overlay 1 has a surface which contains raised areas 2, called buttons, at predetermined locations where switches are to be located. The definition and labeling of these switches is determined by display software. Fig. 1B is an end...