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Heat Treating Process for Spring Clip

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061395D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bollin, RL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a process to heat treat a fabricated spring clip used for electrical contact. As shown in Fig. 1, the fabricated clip 10 contains multi-fingers 12 for use in con- tacting electrical components. This spring contact is formed from high carbon 1095 steel sheet stock. The sheet stock is 0.006, in thickness. The problem is to temper the clip after fabrication to a given Rockwell hardness without warping so as to maintain dimensions, using equipment suitable for model-shop or small-scale production.

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Heat Treating Process for Spring Clip

This article describes a process to heat treat a fabricated spring clip used for electrical contact. As shown in Fig. 1, the fabricated clip 10 contains multi-fingers 12 for use in con- tacting electrical components. This spring contact is formed from high carbon 1095 steel sheet stock. The sheet stock is 0.006, in thickness. The problem is to temper the clip after fabrication to a given Rockwell hardness without warping so as to maintain dimensions, using equipment suitable for model-shop or small-scale production.

SAE 1095 steel contains 0.90-1.03 per cent carbon, and when processed forms austenite steel. The hardening range for 1095 high carbon steel has a narrow window and thus requires close temperature control. The window is between 1390 to 1430o F. If carbon steel which has been reated to the point where it con- sists entirely of austenite is slowly cooled, the process of transformation which took place during the heating will be reversed. Thus, to harden the steel, the first step is to get above the transformation point so that it is entirely austenite steel in structure and the second step is to quench at a rate faster than the critical rate.

The thin material of 1085 steel poses a problem in that when heating or quenching the material tends to warp due to uneven temperature distribution. This can be obviated by tooling designed to control temperature over the entire clip during heat treating. The tooling needed to house the fabricated steel contact clip c...