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Chemical Filter for Air

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061419D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brown, CA: AUTHOR

Abstract

For many devices, such as computers, it is often desirable to filter the air flowing through them, in order to remove trace chemical contamination. Carbon has been used in such filters, but carbon often presents a problem due to dusting. This problem is overcome by using carbon bonded together by traces of non- volatile thermoplastic.

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Chemical Filter for Air

For many devices, such as computers, it is often desirable to filter the air flowing through them, in order to remove trace chemical contamination. Carbon has been used in such filters, but carbon often presents a problem due to dusting. This problem is overcome by using carbon bonded together by traces of non- volatile thermoplastic.

A cup or other shape of the carbon is molded. The bottom may be solid carbon or closed by a piece of impermeable metal or plastic. With this bonded shape, a filter may be assembled by means of a series of these cemented to a front plate; the only seal made is to a simple surface. Of course, the enclosing box must be tight, but this requires only external seals.

In this design, the air pressure of the flow acts to compress the seals of the cups to be metal or plastic face pl The attachment of the cups to the plate may be done with various adhesives, e.g., silicone or epoxy.

As the carbon is bonded together, there is no need for the expense of screens, nor is there a problem of grit or particle abrasion; the granules of carbon cannot move relative to one another.

Disclosed anonymously.

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