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Print Element Band With Inclined Fingers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061443D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cole, NF: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A metal band 1 on which are mounted print elements for a printer is formed with generally rectangular fingers 2 on the outer ends 3 of which are mounted dot print elements 4. Each finger 2 is attached to the band at its inner end 5, and the longitudinal axis 6 of each finger is inclined to the longitudinal axis 7 of the band. The fingers extend alternately from opposite sides of the longitudinal axis 7, and all the elements 4 lie on the axis 7. Each finger 2 is wider at its outer end 3 than at its inner end 5 to provide a suitable region for mounting the element and to provide the required flexibility of the finger.

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Print Element Band With Inclined Fingers

A metal band 1 on which are mounted print elements for a printer is formed with generally rectangular fingers 2 on the outer ends 3 of which are mounted dot print elements 4. Each finger 2 is attached to the band at its inner end 5, and the longitudinal axis 6 of each finger is inclined to the longitudinal axis 7 of the band. The fingers extend alternately from opposite sides of the longitudinal axis 7, and all the elements 4 lie on the axis 7. Each finger 2 is wider at its outer end 3 than at its inner end 5 to provide a suitable region for mounting the element and to provide the required flexibility of the finger. In operation in a printer, the elements 4 cooperate with hammers which selectively strike against the elements in a direction approximately perpendicular to the plane of each finger and cause each selected element to perform a printing operation. Since the hammer may not strike the element exactly perpendicular to the plane of the finger, stresses may be set up in each finger tending to twist the finger about its fixed end 5 and to bend each finger about one or more axes in its plane. By using fingers of the shape illustrated, these stresses tend to be absorbed and the life of the fingers is expected to be longer than with existing shapes of finger.

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