Browse Prior Art Database

Screwdriver/Nutsetter Used in Robotic Application

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061458D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 3 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A screwdriver device is illustrated in Figs. 1-3 which allows easy pickup and return from and to a tooling plate. This device also provides the capability to overdrive with the robot without damage. It is almost impossible to get a vertical drive speed with the robot identical to the thread speed of a screw or nut; hence, compliance is required and included. This device also provides easy driver change. Simply by pulling the driver or pulling and loosening four ball plungers, the driver is removed. A different tool may then be inserted, and the procedure reversed.

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Screwdriver/Nutsetter Used in Robotic Application

A screwdriver device is illustrated in Figs. 1-3 which allows easy pickup and return from and to a tooling plate. This device also provides the capability to overdrive with the robot without damage. It is almost impossible to get a vertical drive speed with the robot identical to the thread speed of a screw or nut; hence, compliance is required and included. This device also provides easy driver change. Simply by pulling the driver or pulling and loosening four ball plungers, the driver is removed. A different tool may then be inserted, and the procedure reversed. The device consists of: Robot interface (and buttonhead screw) 1 Screwdriver (commercial - modified) 2 Bearing cup 3 Retainer 9 Guide bar 8 Spring 14 Bearing 4 Ball plunger 5 Muffler 7 Nutsetter (commercial - modified) 10 Plate, gripper 6 Three screws (compliance) buttonhead 11 Air fitting - 3/8 - 16 - 3/8 tube 13 Four flathead screws, four socket head capscrews Two standoffs 12 Fig. 1 is a front view, Fig. 2 a right side view, and Fig. 3 is a top view of the device. A robot interface 1 is obtained by machining a piece of aluminum alloy to the configuration shown. A round hole with countersink is provided (slip fit for the screwdriver). The countersink at the bottom fits the gear train of the screwdriver
2. Another (larger) countersink is provided at the top to accommodate the retainer 9. Slots are provided on opposite sides to accommodate the air fitting 13 and the guide bar 8. Portions of a commercial screwdriver are obtained and modified as follows. The motor block is replaced by a special block which allows side entry of supply air. A ported block with tapped hole allows the air to enter the motor area and drive the blades. The non-reversible backhead is modified by plugging the entrance and machining the surface flat. The replacement motor block is inserted and a slot machined in the backhead which allows the air fitting 13 to be screwed into the replacement motor block. The retainer 9 is put on the backhead (with holes for guide bar 8 at 180OE from opening for the air fitting 13) and four holes are match drilled and tapped. The guide bar 8 is attached to the retainer 9 via two screws. A third buttonhead and standoff are installed, along with a spring 14 for compliance. The backhead, with motorblock (new) air fitting (guide bar and spring) and retainer 9 are installed in the interface. At this time a fourth screw is installed in the interface 1. A...