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Planar Coupled Inductor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061463D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Felton, BC: AUTHOR

Abstract

This configuration allows very low cost implementation of planar coupled inductors where the coupling and induced voltages are readily calculatable. It also allows very precise transformation ratios with very limited turn. In the structure shown in Fig. 1, concentric or intermeshed conductor coils W1 and W2 are carried by an insulating film 10 sandwiched between two layers 12, 14 of ferromagnetic material (Fig. 2). In such a configuration, the distribution of magnetic flux surrounding a conductor extends a distance controlled by the permeability of the layered ferromagnetic material, the permeability of the material in the gap between the layers and the length of gap between 12 and 14. By appropriate selection of the above parameters, the flux distribution can be predicted and controlled.

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Planar Coupled Inductor

This configuration allows very low cost implementation of planar coupled inductors where the coupling and induced voltages are readily calculatable. It also allows very precise transformation ratios with very limited turn. In the structure shown in Fig. 1, concentric or intermeshed conductor coils W1 and W2 are carried by an insulating film 10 sandwiched between two layers 12, 14 of ferromagnetic material (Fig. 2). In such a configuration, the distribution of magnetic flux surrounding a conductor extends a distance controlled by the permeability of the layered ferromagnetic material, the permeability of the material in the gap between the layers and the length of gap between 12 and 14. By appropriate selection of the above parameters, the flux distribution can be predicted and controlled. In this case, if a second conductor W2 is placed near the first conductor W1, the coupling of one to the other is limited to the flux generated by the first conductor that extends past the second conductor. We can then control the coupling by fixing the distance between the two conductors for a given magnetic flux distribution. If the conductors W1, W2 are formed into loops as shown in Fig. 1, where the dimension (diameter) is large compared to the flux distribution and also large compared to the effective spacing 16 between conductor coil W1 loops and conductor coil W2 loops, then coupling is not affected by the size of the loops, but merely by the number of turns of coil W1 coupled to the number of turns of coil W2. For the special case where no current flows in one of the conductors (e.g., coil W2) from the voltage induced in...