Browse Prior Art Database

Preventing Screen Overrun During Command Execution

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061465D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kilpatrick, PJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

By adopting the convention that command output is displayed on the screen 20 lines at a time and that screen selection is user controlled, scrolling of information off the screen, until after the user has had an opportunity to evaluate the information, is prevented. Command output in the typical UNIX* environment is such that if the output is longer than the screen, the output continuously scrolls across the screen from bottom to top, making reading of the first part, or the other parts of the output, difficult if not impossible. This problem is solved by adopting the convention that command output is displayed on the screen 20 lines at a time. This is accomplished by piping the output data to the "l" command. The user presses the return key to see the next screen load of information. * Trademark of AT&T Bell Laboratories.

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Preventing Screen Overrun During Command Execution

By adopting the convention that command output is displayed on the screen 20 lines at a time and that screen selection is user controlled, scrolling of information off the screen, until after the user has had an opportunity to evaluate the information, is prevented. Command output in the typical UNIX* environment is such that if the output is longer than the screen, the output continuously scrolls across the screen from bottom to top, making reading of the first part, or the other parts of the output, difficult if not impossible. This problem is solved by adopting the convention that command output is displayed on the screen 20 lines at a time. This is accomplished by piping the output data to the "l" command. The user presses the return key to see the next screen load of information. * Trademark of AT&T Bell Laboratories.

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