Browse Prior Art Database

Paperless System for Inspection and Rework of Circuit Boards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061509D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 91K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kluever, RC: AUTHOR

Abstract

A paperless printed circuit board inspection system is disclosed for use in connection with a later rework or repair of the board. In this system, an inspection record is created from a manual inspection of the board populated with components and comparison with a visual display on a monitor. The results of the inspection are stored in association with an identification of the board (such as its serial number) for later recall during any necessary rework of the board. Fig. 1 shows the outline of the steps involved in the disclosed process for its preferred application of inspecting circuit boards, although inspections of other parts could be done advantageously. Fig. 2 illustrates a representative template, after an inspection of a board has occurred.

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Paperless System for Inspection and Rework of Circuit Boards

A paperless printed circuit board inspection system is disclosed for use in connection with a later rework or repair of the board. In this system, an inspection record is created from a manual inspection of the board populated with components and comparison with a visual display on a monitor. The results of the inspection are stored in association with an identification of the board (such as its serial number) for later recall during any necessary rework of the board. Fig. 1 shows the outline of the steps involved in the disclosed process for its preferred application of inspecting circuit boards, although inspections of other parts could be done advantageously. Fig. 2 illustrates a representative template, after an inspection of a board has occurred. A layout of the board in its preferred orientation with a desired complement of parts is drawn and stored in a memory as a first step, represented by block 100. Next, a board is identified in block 110, as by scanning a board serial number representation in a bar code using a light pen scanner. At block 120, the results of the inspection are noted by locating and identifying a particular component on a display and identifying one or more particular defect(s) associated with the particular component on a menu also appearing the display. The particular component, the defect(s) noted and the identification of the board are then stored in memory indicated by block 130 while the inspection proce...