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Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamic Charging System and Battery Monitor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061528D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Balliet, L: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article describes a dynamic charging system and battery monitor which provides a measure of a battery's ability to act as an energy storage device with early warning of degradation and/or isolates other faults in the system. Automotive batteries have been a major cause for concern for years, but no effective means have been used to isolate electrical system problems to a defective battery. The arrangement disclosed herein provides a means for early detection of a deteriorating battery long before it is useless. It applies particularly to automotive systems. Fig. 1 is a block diagram of the present system arrangement which consists of a maintenance computer which can have as one of its many in-vehicle functions the task of monitoring the quality of the battery 4.

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Dynamic Charging System and Battery Monitor

This article describes a dynamic charging system and battery monitor which provides a measure of a battery's ability to act as an energy storage device with early warning of degradation and/or isolates other faults in the system. Automotive batteries have been a major cause for concern for years, but no effective means have been used to isolate electrical system problems to a defective battery. The arrangement disclosed herein provides a means for early detection of a deteriorating battery long before it is useless. It applies particularly to automotive systems. Fig. 1 is a block diagram of the present system arrangement which consists of a maintenance computer which can have as one of its many in-vehicle functions the task of monitoring the quality of the battery 4. This function is performed by having the maintenance computer control alternately the charge/discharge of the battery on a cyclical basis. By sensing the amount of current required to charge the battery to a specific voltage through a current sensor 2 and comparing it to the amount of current removed from the battery during the discharge cycle, the maintenance computer can establish a figure of merit for the battery. This information can be stored in non-volatile memory and can be used as a base line for future measurements. A defective battery requires a significantly larger amount of current to charge it to a specific full charge voltage (e.g., 14.1 V) than would be available to the vehicle loads 5. Fig. 2 illustrates a typical charge/discharge test...