Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Collection of Accounting Data

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061558D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Drew, RM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The simplest example of this accounting technique is a two-system, frontend-backend split. System A contains a DC component (DCC) which performs session control, mapping support (IMS/MFS), transaction determination, and the sending and receiving of messages on the network. System B contains an IMS transaction scheduler, and performs application scheduling and data base access and management. An objective in this environment is to account and bill for the actual services required to process an entire transaction. Transactions are received and mapped on System A, routed to System B, and processed on System B. Output is routed back to System A for response to the input terminal. In today's technology, there is no simple way to correlate the work done on behalf of this transaction by System A with that done by System B.

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Method for Collection of Accounting Data

The simplest example of this accounting technique is a two-system, frontend- backend split. System A contains a DC component (DCC) which performs session control, mapping support (IMS/MFS), transaction determination, and the sending and receiving of messages on the network. System B contains an IMS transaction scheduler, and performs application scheduling and data base access and management. An objective in this environment is to account and bill for the actual services required to process an entire transaction. Transactions are received and mapped on System A, routed to System B, and processed on System B. Output is routed back to System A for response to the input terminal. In today's technology, there is no simple way to correlate the work done on behalf of this transaction by System A with that done by System B. Each partner in a frontend-backend split treats the transaction individually and accounts it separately. Each customer must build a custom process to correlate the data from the two systems. The result is costly and requires complex processing to obtain a simple result. Routing in XMF (Transaction Management Facility) uses the facilities of the Message Management Component (MMC). This provides the ability to route messages or records to named destinations without knowledge of the destination's location. In this implementation, an additional subsystem, the XMF Accounting subsystem, might reside on one of the two systems, for example, System A. DCC, IMS, and XMF Accounting are all known to and connected to the MMC. When the DCC receives the input, it assigns a unique message identifier and places it in the message prefix. After the DCC processes and maps the input and routes the transaction to System B, it also routes an accounting record to XMF Accounting. This record indicates the number and size of input segments, and the amount of CPU service required by the input message. It contains the message identifier as a key field. When System B completes p...