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Advanced Print Head for Quality Print, Kanji, Graphics and High Speed Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061571D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Humphreys, FR: AUTHOR

Abstract

A technique is described whereby a matrix print head incorporating twenty-seven wires (more or less) provides a dual function: (a) high density quality printing as required for Kanji characterization and graphics printing and (b) high-speed parallel printing for data processing (DP) application printing. Since Kanji printing normally requires a matrix print head consisting of a minimum of twenty-four wires, so as to produce quality characterization, the print head, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, consists of twenty-seven wires to form the print head matrix. The additional wires provide a denser printing result, since the wires are closely packaged. To obtain the closely packed configuration, the wires are staggered, as shown in Fig. 1, so that, if all pins were operating together, the pins would form twenty-seven print planes.

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Advanced Print Head for Quality Print, Kanji, Graphics and High Speed Printing

A technique is described whereby a matrix print head incorporating twenty- seven wires (more or less) provides a dual function: (a) high density quality printing as required for Kanji characterization and graphics printing and (b) high- speed parallel printing for data processing (DP) application printing. Since Kanji printing normally requires a matrix print head consisting of a minimum of twenty- four wires, so as to produce quality characterization, the print head, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, consists of twenty-seven wires to form the print head matrix. The additional wires provide a denser printing result, since the wires are closely packaged. To obtain the closely packed configuration, the wires are staggered, as shown in Fig. 1, so that, if all pins were operating together, the pins would form twenty-seven print planes. To obtain Kanji and/or graphics and high quality text printing, the print head is positioned as shown in Fig. 1. For high-speed parallel DP-type printing, the head is rotated, as shown in Fig. 2, so as to horizontally align the three pins of each of the three columns. If all pins were operating together, this configuration would form nine print planes. By use of alternate pin-firing techniques, this position will produce a fifty percent increase in DP printing speed, as compared with the prior-art eighteen-wire print head matrix.

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