Browse Prior Art Database

Compact Fixed Delay Lines

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061631D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Davidson, A: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article relates generally to delay lines for electrical signals and more particularly to mechanically fixed delay lines wherein the delay line itself is a coplanar waveguide. Referring to Fig. 1, the system consists of coplanar stripline loops made of copper, nickel, or other suitable conducting metal laminated onto or otherwise manufactured on a long thin polyimide, MYLAR* or other flexible substrate. The substrate may have typical dimensions of 1.0 cm wide by .25 mm thick. The length will depend on the electrical delay desired. A delay of 10.0 ns per meter of line length is the delay for a 3.0 substrate dielectric constant. Thus a 1.0 meter delay line loop may produce a 20.0 ns signal delay.

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Compact Fixed Delay Lines

This article relates generally to delay lines for electrical signals and more particularly to mechanically fixed delay lines wherein the delay line itself is a coplanar waveguide. Referring to Fig. 1, the system consists of coplanar stripline loops made of copper, nickel, or other suitable conducting metal laminated onto or otherwise manufactured on a long thin polyimide, MYLAR* or other flexible substrate. The substrate may have typical dimensions of 1.0 cm wide by .25 mm thick. The length will depend on the electrical delay desired. A delay of 10.0 ns per meter of line length is the delay for a 3.0 substrate dielectric constant. Thus a 1.0 meter delay line loop may produce a 20.0 ns signal delay. The coplanar stripline or striplines of different length are wound concentrically on a support cylinder to form a compact package of fixed delay lines, spaced one cm apart. Contact is made to the delay line loops by means of miniature spring contacts, as shown in Fig. 2. The delay line loops may be connected singly or in series to produce additive signal propagation delays. Delays of over 100 ns in 1.0 ns steps may be readily obtained in a light compact package whose largest dimension need be no more than a few cm. This system has applications in signal sampling systems where signal delays of 1.0 to 100 ns are required. Other applications are in radar and radio in airplanes or spacecraft where weight reduction is important. * Trademark of E. I...