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Browse Prior Art Database

Motor Seal and Clamping Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061680D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Herman, PM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The typical first-disk file pressure test in the clean room requires the motor area of the base casting to be sealed off with a zero leakage seal. This seal has to be easily applied and removed, durable, able to seal against a coated, cast aluminum surface, and compliant enough to take up the casting tolerances. The pressure test is automated and, therefore, the disk enclosure (DE) is placed on and removed from the work surface by a rotary transfer device. This requires the DE to be fixed and aligned on the work surface (i.e., by pins) so the transfer device can consistently pick it up. Previous methods of sealing the motor area involved pushing a soft durometer seal against the bottom of the DE after having clamped the DE to the work surface. This method has a number of problems.

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Motor Seal and Clamping Device

The typical first-disk file pressure test in the clean room requires the motor area of the base casting to be sealed off with a zero leakage seal. This seal has to be easily applied and removed, durable, able to seal against a coated, cast aluminum surface, and compliant enough to take up the casting tolerances. The pressure test is automated and, therefore, the disk enclosure (DE) is placed on and removed from the work surface by a rotary transfer device. This requires the DE to be fixed and aligned on the work surface (i.e., by pins) so the transfer device can consistently pick it up. Previous methods of sealing the motor area involved pushing a soft durometer seal against the bottom of the DE after having clamped the DE to the work surface. This method has a number of problems. First, because the DE is located on the surface by precisely located pins, the small sealing surface 3 (Fig. 1) can be located in a relatively large area because of large tolerances between it and the locating holes 4. This requires the seal material to be a large, flat surface in order to work in all possible situations. The low durometer materials available, in addition to requiring fabrication and being costly, have questionable durability, are permanently deformed after repeated use, and are high maintenance items. Sealing on the bottom of the DE also requires the associated hardware, control, and expense of the clamping mechanism necessary to hold the...