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In-Situ Technique for Simultaneous Monitoring of Critical Components in Plating Baths

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061712D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bindra, P: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Simultaneous monitoring of the concentrations of multiple plating bath components can be made in the bath directly with a single measurement by using a rotating disc electrode and differential pulse voltammetry. With this monitor, a potential is applied to the rotating disk electrode in a series of small, constant amplitude pulses of short duration on a normal DC voltage ramp. The pulse heights are generally between 10 and 100 mV, and in a given measurement are the same with respect to the base potential. Two current samples are taken for each pair of potential pulses. One is taken at time t, immediately prior to the pulse, and the other is taken at time tl, just before the pulse is ended. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) is then used to measure the current difference.

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In-Situ Technique for Simultaneous Monitoring of Critical Components in Plating Baths

Simultaneous monitoring of the concentrations of multiple plating bath components can be made in the bath directly with a single measurement by using a rotating disc electrode and differential pulse voltammetry. With this monitor, a potential is applied to the rotating disk electrode in a series of small, constant amplitude pulses of short duration on a normal DC voltage ramp. The pulse heights are generally between 10 and 100 mV, and in a given measurement are the same with respect to the base potential. Two current samples are taken for each pair of potential pulses. One is taken at time t, immediately prior to the pulse, and the other is taken at time tl, just before the pulse is ended. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) is then used to measure the current difference. The data is recorded as a plot of the current difference, (i(t)-i(tl)h, versus the base potential prior to the pulse. The pulse width is generally in the vicinity of 50 msec, and the base potential period between short pulses varies from 0.5 to 4 seconds. The peaks associated with the DPV measurements indicate either an oxidation or reduction reaction of an electroactive species. As the current response is in the form of a peak, the height of the peak is directly related to the concentration of the species being oxidized or reduced. The potential of the oxidation or reduction reaction identifies the species. The peak potential is related to the half-wave...