Browse Prior Art Database

System Controllable Keyboard ID Through Use of an EEPROM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061717D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ellis, JF: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A keyboard ID can be changed through the use of an EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable memory) device within the electronics of an intelligent keyboard. An EEPROM, such as National NMC9306, for example, can be programmed at the time of manufacture of an intelligent keyboard for a default ID. (This is for a particular language, for example, such as English.) When the keyboard is operated in a new configuration, such as a different language, the EEPROM may be programmed with a new ID so that a terminal display, such as at a CPU, will know that a different configuration is being employed and what the new configuration is. The current keyboard ID technique employs fixed jumpers on selected pairs of pins. This does not allow user modification in the field when there is a change in configuration.

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System Controllable Keyboard ID Through Use of an EEPROM

A keyboard ID can be changed through the use of an EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable memory) device within the electronics of an intelligent keyboard. An EEPROM, such as National NMC9306, for example, can be programmed at the time of manufacture of an intelligent keyboard for a default ID. (This is for a particular language, for example, such as English.) When the keyboard is operated in a new configuration, such as a different language, the EEPROM may be programmed with a new ID so that a terminal display, such as at a CPU, will know that a different configuration is being employed and what the new configuration is. The current keyboard ID technique employs fixed jumpers on selected pairs of pins. This does not allow user modification in the field when there is a change in configuration. In the proposed technique, when the user changes the keyboard graphics, such as the labeling on the keys, the EEPROM is activated for the new language. This change in the keyboard ID enables the CPU to know that a different graphic structure, such as a different language, is being used by the keyboard so that the CPU will use the appropriate display for the specific graphic structure.

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