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Rotating Cone Plating Cell

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061755D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Tang, J: AUTHOR

Abstract

Hull cells are commonly used in the analysis of a variety of plating baths. One limitation of the Hull cell analysis is the difficulty in maintaining uniform agitation of its cathode surface. Because uneven agitation can lead to an ambiguous boundary resulting in the wrong interpretation of the quality of plating, an agitation system that overcomes this limitation is described below. A funnel-shaped cone 1 (Fig. 1) is inserted into a hole 2 of a cylindrical container 3. The end of the cone 1 is a cylindrical tip 4. The cone 1 and container 3 are made of an appropriate insulating material. A strip of cathode 5 is attached to the side of cone 1, and an anode 6 is placed on the wall of container 3. The cone 1 is rotated by a shaft 7 that is connected to cone 1.

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Rotating Cone Plating Cell

Hull cells are commonly used in the analysis of a variety of plating baths. One limitation of the Hull cell analysis is the difficulty in maintaining uniform agitation of its cathode surface. Because uneven agitation can lead to an ambiguous boundary resulting in the wrong interpretation of the quality of plating, an agitation system that overcomes this limitation is described below. A funnel- shaped cone 1 (Fig. 1) is inserted into a hole 2 of a cylindrical container 3. The end of the cone 1 is a cylindrical tip 4. The cone 1 and container 3 are made of an appropriate insulating material. A strip of cathode 5 is attached to the side of cone 1, and an anode 6 is placed on the wall of container 3. The cone 1 is rotated by a shaft 7 that is connected to cone 1. During plating, the rotation of cone 1 provides uniform agitation on cathode 5. The degree of agitation is controlled by the angular velocity of the rotating shaft 7 so that reproducibility is precise. To check the covering power with a Hull cell, a separate test is performed at very low plating current to obtain that low current density region. The portion of cathode 5 on top of cylinder 4 provides such a low current density area to simulate the conditions encountered in a plated-through hole; therefore, this Hull cell design can provide both the brightening power and throwing power information in one test. An alternative arrangement is seen in Fig. 2. The plating on a cathode 8 i...