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Automatic Changing of Programmed Symbol Set According to Printing Font

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061763D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Borkin, SA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article deals with a feature in a "what-you-see is what-you-get" (WYSIWYG) editor-formatter to see on the screen as close a representation of the final printed document as is possible. This includes seeing the typestyles (fonts) in which the document text will print. The approach here is to download into terminals with a Programmed Symbol Set (PSS) capability, a symbol set that matches the printing font. Since formatting controls are not explicitly displayed in a WYSIWYG system (as opposed to a batch formatter, such as a Document Composition Facility), it is not possible for the user to deduce the font of a given character string as he would with the source for a batch formatter (by scanning backwards from that string until the most recent font control is found).

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Automatic Changing of Programmed Symbol Set According to Printing Font

This article deals with a feature in a "what-you-see is what-you-get" (WYSIWYG) editor-formatter to see on the screen as close a representation of the final printed document as is possible. This includes seeing the typestyles (fonts) in which the document text will print. The approach here is to download into terminals with a Programmed Symbol Set (PSS) capability, a symbol set that matches the printing font. Since formatting controls are not explicitly displayed in a WYSIWYG system (as opposed to a batch formatter, such as a Document Composition Facility), it is not possible for the user to deduce the font of a given character string as he would with the source for a batch formatter (by scanning backwards from that string until the most recent font control is found). Existing WYSIWYG systems either make use of built-in alternate symbol sets in the terminal (and so are in no way guaranteed to match the printing font), or use all- points-addressable (APA) displays. This approach allows ordinary non-APA displays, such as 3278- and 3279-type terminals with the PSS capability, to be used for WYSIWYG editors. The advantages of downloading a PSS that looks like the printing font it represents is that (1) the user can tell the fonts of text directly without having to perform some computation, and (2) the document as displayed on the screen looks much closer to how it will print, so that the user can...