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Browse Prior Art Database

Storage of Format State Information According to Frequency of Change

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061765D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Borkin, SA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is an improvement for editor-formatters in which the format state (the complete set of formatting attributes) at a given location is derivable from an initial document format modified by a sequence of format changes associated with different locations in the document. Editor-formatters must be able to derive the format state for any point in a document. This can be done by the storage of redundant information or by recomputing the format state. The conventional approach in prior editor-formatters is to (1) store the format state information for all attributes at the beginning of the document and at the beginning of every page or (2) store the format state information for all attributes at the beginning of the document only (in addition to the storage of the format changes).

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Storage of Format State Information According to Frequency of Change

Disclosed is an improvement for editor-formatters in which the format state (the complete set of formatting attributes) at a given location is derivable from an initial document format modified by a sequence of format changes associated with different locations in the document. Editor-formatters must be able to derive the format state for any point in a document. This can be done by the storage of redundant information or by recomputing the format state. The conventional approach in prior editor-formatters is to (1) store the format state information for all attributes at the beginning of the document and at the beginning of every page or (2) store the format state information for all attributes at the beginning of the document only (in addition to the storage of the format changes). The first approach can result in excessive use of storage and extra computation, while the second approach results in excessive computation. The first approach is also difficult to use in an editor-formatter which does frequent repagination since it would require frequent moving of the format state information. In order to solve the above problem, the present approach is arranged to (1) separate the format attributes into subsets according to the frequency with which the attributes are changed and (2) provide a means for varying the intervals between storage in the document of format states for the different subsets. For exam...