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Selection With a Hierarchical Group of Objects

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061790D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 3 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gibbard, JM: AUTHOR

Abstract

When a picture is drawn on an interactive graphics screen, the basic objects are organized into a hierarchy and a replica of the structure together with drawing instructions for the objects is stored. This enables subsequent selection of basic objects, sub-groups or whole groups of the hierarchy for manipulation by a cursor. In an interactive graphics application the picture being manipulated commonly has within it hierarchically organized objects. When interacting with the picture, using, for example, a graphics input device, it is necessary to allow the user to select within this hierarchy and operate on the data so selected. See the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin 28, 3305-3307 (January 1986). Basic objects in a picture can be organized into hierarchies.

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Selection With a Hierarchical Group of Objects

When a picture is drawn on an interactive graphics screen, the basic objects are organized into a hierarchy and a replica of the structure together with drawing instructions for the objects is stored. This enables subsequent selection of basic objects, sub-groups or whole groups of the hierarchy for manipulation by a cursor. In an interactive graphics application the picture being manipulated commonly has within it hierarchically organized objects.

When interacting with the picture, using, for example, a graphics input device, it is necessary to allow the user to select within this hierarchy and operate on the data so selected. See the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin 28, 3305-3307 (January 1986). Basic objects in a picture can be organized into hierarchies. Fig 1 shows a house and a tree whose hierarchical structure (Fig 2) is organized into a group and a simple object TREE which is not part of a group. CHIMNEY, ROOF, WALLS, WINDOW1, WINDOW2, FRAME and KNOB are basic objects. DOOR is a subgroup within the subgroup FRAMEWORK within the group HOUSE. The group structure is redrawn in Fig 3 with groups and sub-groups as circles and basic objects as rectangles. Each rectangle represents a storage segment storing drawing orders for the corresponding basic objects. The arrows from groups to basic objects represent call routines. Also stored is the group structure to permit selection within the structure. This arrangement enables the following manipulations to be performed. With the cursor positioned on a simple object (TREE in this example) the first time select is used the object becomes selected (and highlighted in some way), the second time it becomes deselected, the third time selected, etc. With the...