Browse Prior Art Database

Indirect Keyed Electronic Journal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061868D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Douyotas, DW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a new process for searching an electronic journal. The process consists of the definition of an association of the real search key within the journal record to a logical key and the translation of the logical key to the actual search data when the journal record is retrieved.

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Indirect Keyed Electronic Journal

This article describes a new process for searching an electronic journal. The process consists of the definition of an association of the real search key within the journal record to a logical key and the translation of the logical key to the actual search data when the journal record is retrieved.

Any banking system requires the capability to provide a journal of the teller's daily activities. This journal may be either hard copy or soft copy. A hard copy journal consists of a printed record for each transaction. In a soft copy journaling, the records are written to some electronic storage media, also called an electronic journal.

One problem associated with electronic journals is the capability to retrieve data needed by the teller for reconciliation of the teller's cash position at the end of the day. The teller would like to retrieve data from the electronic journal based on whatever information they can remember about some particular transaction or group of transactions. The teller may remember the approximate time of day or the customer name or the dollar amount of the transaction or any of several other parameters. Thus, an electronic journaling system must have a lot of flexibility for retrieving data.

Data is retrieved from the journal based on information stored in the journal called search keys. Current systems require the search key to be in a particular location of every record. For example, if account number is a search key, it must begin in byte xx of the journal record and be yy bytes long. This makes it difficult to add new formats of a journal record which may be associated with a new transaction. It is difficult to add new search keys, which were not considered when the original design of the system was completed. Multiple occurrences of the same key within a record require speci...