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Low Leakage Active Carbon Filter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061910D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hunziker, HE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

An active carbon filter is described in which the flow of air through the carbon beds is downward so that the filter not only greatly reduces the concentration of airborne contaminants but also greatly reduces dust particles in the air out of the filter.

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Low Leakage Active Carbon Filter

An active carbon filter is described in which the flow of air through the carbon beds is downward so that the filter not only greatly reduces the concentration of airborne contaminants but also greatly reduces dust particles in the air out of the filter.

The filter, as shown in the cut-away view, comprises a plurality of horizontal carbon beds 1 which are stacked vertically. The horizontal arrangement of the beds prevents the formation of voids of the ends of the beds which are a problem encountered with vertical beds. Shaped interior walls are provided to direct incoming air through the carbon beds. An L-shaped wall 2 is provided at top and bottom (not shown) of the filter. An S-shaped wall 3 is provided between adjacent carbon beds 1 which serves to enclose the long sides of the carbon beds and to separate the wedge-shaped inflow slots 4 and the outflow slots 5. The walls 2 and 3 are attached and sealed to the sides 6 of the filter case along their entire length to prevent mechanical leakage. The carbon beds 1 are held in position by r wire screen panels 7 which are connected between adjacent walls.

The path of the air through the filter is in through inflow slot 4, downward through the carbon bed 1, and out through outflow slot 5. In this design no channels or leaks are formed by settling. The downward flow compacts the beds rather that stirring them up, preventing both the formation of channels and dust during operation. As a...