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Improved Pull Test Using a Revised Metal Stud

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061969D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Park, JM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A metal stud for performing the pull test is newly designed to yield more accurate pull strength data than those obtained using conventional metal studs.

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Improved Pull Test Using a Revised Metal Stud

A metal stud for performing the pull test is newly designed to yield more accurate pull strength data than those obtained using conventional metal studs.

The pull test is the most commonly used method for comparing the adhesion performance of multilayer structures, consisting of brittle materials or very thin layers on rigid substrates. The pull test consists of gluing a metal stud at a 90- degree angle onto the surface of a sample and pulling the stud in a direction perpendicular to the sample surface at room temperature using an adequate tester. The pull strength is defined as the force per unit contact area between the glue and the sample, which is required to pull the top layer off the underlying structure. The glue is selected on the basis that the weakest spot of the sample during the pull test resides at interface whose pull strength is to be determined.

However, experiments show that pull strength data obtained using the conventional metal studs as shown in Fig. 1 are often inaccurate because of high relative spreads involved. Such spreads are due to bulging of the glue at the edge of the stud and differences in the thickness and amount of the glue under the stud.

The accuracy of pull test can be greatly improved using a revised metal stud as shown in Fig. 2. With the sharp edge of the stud piercing into the sample, the contact area between the glue and the sample is fixed. The cone-shaped chamber in the stud...