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Robotic Vacuum Tip With Compliancy But Not Resiliency

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000061978D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Winstead, R: AUTHOR

Abstract

Fig. 1 shows a standard robotic tip and an improved tip. A component D which is typically misaligned as shown is to be picked up by a vacuum applied at C to the tips shown. The tip labeled as "Original Tip" frequently fails to pick component weight due to the vacuum not sealing properly when used without rubber A. This "Original Tip," when used with the rubber A, and component centering devices F picks the component more reliably but the centering devices F fail to properly align and position the component with respect to the Tip. This misalignment is due to the resiliency or spring-back of the rubber, as the component centering devices F are actuated; the component is held against the tip by vacuum applied at C; the component is forcibly displaced horizontally and radially to an optimum "aligned" position.

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Robotic Vacuum Tip With Compliancy But Not Resiliency

Fig. 1 shows a standard robotic tip and an improved tip. A component D which is typically misaligned as shown is to be picked up by a vacuum applied at C to the tips shown. The tip labeled as "Original Tip" frequently fails to pick component weight due to the vacuum not sealing properly when used without rubber A. This "Original Tip," when used with the rubber A, and component centering devices F picks the component more reliably but the centering devices F fail to properly align and position the component with respect to the Tip. This misalignment is due to the resiliency or spring-back of the rubber, as the component centering devices F are actuated; the component is held against the tip by vacuum applied at C; the component is forcibly displaced horizontally and radially to an optimum "aligned" position. When the component centering devices F are retracted from the component while the component is still being held by vacuum applied at C, the component springs back to a non-aligned position due to the resiliency of the rubber A. Thus, the rubber which helped correct a failure to pick up the component now poses a misalignment problem known as "memory."

Using the improved "Tip," the spherical end E, held into a socket resembling the "Original Tip," compensates for misalignment of the component D. During pickup, the component is picked up very reliably by a vacuum applied at C. Furthermore, as the component cen...