Browse Prior Art Database

Formation of Gold Grains

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062084D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aboelfotoh, MO: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article relates generally to integrated circuit fabrication and, more particularly, to the formation of large gold grains as thin films. The deposition of gold grains in larger size can be achieved without the necessity of altering the structure of silicon substrates. This reduces the gold-silicon interaction, the number of grain boundaries in conducting stripes, and entire circuits can be fabricated in a single crystal grain. Gold deposition via electron beam evaporation is done at a high rate of approximately 50 ˜ per second or faster on substrates held at a low temperature. The substrate temperature can range from room temperature to 250ŒC. Where the substrate is held at room temperature, grain sizes of approximately 0.5 micron are obtained.

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Formation of Gold Grains

This article relates generally to integrated circuit fabrication and, more particularly, to the formation of large gold grains as thin films. The deposition of gold grains in larger size can be achieved without the necessity of altering the structure of silicon substrates. This reduces the gold-silicon interaction, the number of grain boundaries in conducting stripes, and entire circuits can be fabricated in a single crystal grain. Gold deposition via electron beam evaporation is done at a high rate of approximately 50 ~ per second or faster on substrates held at a low temperature. The substrate temperature can range from room temperature to 250OEC. Where the substrate is held at room temperature, grain sizes of approximately 0.5 micron are obtained. Increasing substrate temperature does not alter grain size but increases the number of large grains. Smooth substrates produce the largest gold grain size. However, the resulting grain size does not depend on the type of substrate whether the substrate is single crystal silicon or amorphous silicon nitride or silicon dioxide.

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