Browse Prior Art Database

Extendable Robot Controller

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062126D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Floyd, RE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a robot controller which includes both electrical logic and system software that allows the controller to assume 100% control over equipment that is used in conjunction with the robot. Some existing robot controllers have provided means for the user to interface with other equipment and thus integrate the robot into the overall manufacturing line, but none allows the robot controller to assume complete control of surrounding equipment. Fig. 1 is a block diagram showing the robot control and auxiliary control paths. The implementation of the controller disclosed herein is in a robot that has six axes of motion, but whose controller has been designed to control seven axes or more.

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Extendable Robot Controller

This article describes a robot controller which includes both electrical logic and system software that allows the controller to assume 100% control over equipment that is used in conjunction with the robot. Some existing robot controllers have provided means for the user to interface with other equipment and thus integrate the robot into the overall manufacturing line, but none allows the robot controller to assume complete control of surrounding equipment. Fig. 1 is a block diagram showing the robot control and auxiliary control paths. The implementation of the controller disclosed herein is in a robot that has six axes of motion, but whose controller has been designed to control seven axes or more. Each axis is controlled by a microprocessor card, and the seventh card in each controller is available for the user to connect to another piece of equipment. This card will be dedicated to complete microprocessor control of the other equipment and may be programmed along with the six axes of the robot itself. The degree to which the operation of the other equipment and the robot will be interdependent is determined by the master control card and how it is programmed at "teach" time. The master control card that oversees the overall operation of the robot contains a more sophisticated microprocessor than the axis control cards and has built in a block of 32 input/output (I/O) lines that have no function on the robot itself. The master thus...