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In Situ Electrochemical Technique for Monitoring the Activity of Electroless Plating Baths

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062282D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Arbach, GV: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The instantaneous plating rate or activity of an electroless plating bath can be measured in situ by monitoring the polarization resistance of the bath. Into an electroless plating bath, or, optionally, into a side bath flow through, a counter electrode, a reference electrode and a rotating disk electrode are inserted. A scanning triangle waveform is then applied to the rotating disc electrode in incremental steps. The current generated by the bath is then measured. At the mixed potential (cathodic reaction current exactly compensated by anodic reaction), the plating current is generated and the voltage is a constant equal to the scan rate. At the same mixed potential, the polarization resistance is then inversely proportional to the time derivative of the current only.

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In Situ Electrochemical Technique for Monitoring the Activity of Electroless Plating Baths

The instantaneous plating rate or activity of an electroless plating bath can be measured in situ by monitoring the polarization resistance of the bath. Into an electroless plating bath, or, optionally, into a side bath flow through, a counter electrode, a reference electrode and a rotating disk electrode are inserted. A scanning triangle waveform is then applied to the rotating disc electrode in incremental steps. The current generated by the bath is then measured. At the mixed potential (cathodic reaction current exactly compensated by anodic reaction), the plating current is generated and the voltage is a constant equal to the scan rate. At the same mixed potential, the polarization resistance is then inversely proportional to the time derivative of the current only. The time derivative of the current can be determined by 1. plotting current versus time, manually, from the measurements made by using the triangle waveform, 2. direct measurement with a standard differentiating circuit to monitor current, or 3. using a microprocessor and a potentiostat to determine the line of current versus time by means of linear regression as the value goes through zero. By equating the time derivative of the current to the polarization resistance, the polarization resistance can be compared to calibration curves, indicating a specific level of plating activity. Instead of cyclic voltamm...