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Thermal Ribbon

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062310D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Findlay, HT: AUTHOR

Abstract

In thermal typing effective balance between correction lift-off and resistance to abrasion of the printed character is obtained by incorporating a solid lubricant in the ink. Variations in the machine and the environment, as well as in the materials used to make the ribbon, can upset this balance. An increase in abrasion resistance as well as an improvement in correction lift-off can provide a wider safety margin between these two apparently contradictory requirements. Glyceryl monostearate (KEMESTER 6000*) can be dispersed in solid form into the thermal ink by mechanical means (ball milling) and without dispersing or emulsifying aids. Specifically the ink is a water- borne formula, as described in U.S. Patent 4,384,797. On drying, particles of glyceryl monostearate are dispersed in solid form throughout the solid ink.

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Thermal Ribbon

In thermal typing effective balance between correction lift-off and resistance to abrasion of the printed character is obtained by incorporating a solid lubricant in the ink. Variations in the machine and the environment, as well as in the materials used to make the ribbon, can upset this balance. An increase in abrasion resistance as well as an improvement in correction lift-off can provide a wider safety margin between these two apparently contradictory requirements. Glyceryl monostearate (KEMESTER 6000*) can be dispersed in solid form into the thermal ink by mechanical means (ball milling) and without dispersing or emulsifying aids. Specifically the ink is a water- borne formula, as described in U.S. Patent 4,384,797. On drying, particles of glyceryl monostearate are dispersed in solid form throughout the solid ink. The drawing shows a cross- section of the finished ribbon. Melting and transferring of the ink to paper, such as by an IBM QUIETWRITER** typewriter, results in a more homogeneous distribution of the glyceryl monostearate throughout both ink and interlayer. Many stearates, including the glyceryl monostearate, tend to migrate and crystallize with time from a polymer mixture. This phenomenon is believed to occur and to cause a bloom of the stearate crystals to form on the outer surface of the printed character. The outer layer of the glyceryl monostearate acts as a lubricant and hence allows abrading surfaces to slide over the surface o...