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Extended Virtualized Reset to Initial State Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062411D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fatahalian, FH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The scope of the reinitialization is extended to include reconfigurable modules. The ANSI 3.64 standard describes the multi-byte control sequence, Reset to Initial State (RIS), as follows: "Resets a device to its initial state, that is, the state it has after it is switched on. This may imply, if applicable: remove tabulation stops, remove input areas, reset graphic rendition, erase all positions, move active position to first character position of first line." The above RIS control standard is extended to include a reinitialization of virtual keyboard, unique character set, and echo/break map. This reinitialization spans two levels of abstraction, as may be demonstrated using the keyboard as an example: 1. The software keyboard for each virtual terminal may be customized independently of all others by a service call (SVC).

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Extended Virtualized Reset to Initial State Control

The scope of the reinitialization is extended to include reconfigurable modules. The ANSI 3.64 standard describes the multi-byte control sequence, Reset to Initial State (RIS), as follows: "Resets a device to its initial state, that is, the state it has after it is switched on. This may imply, if applicable: remove tabulation stops, remove input areas, reset graphic rendition, erase all positions, move active position to first character position of first line." The above RIS control standard is extended to include a reinitialization of virtual keyboard, unique character set, and echo/break map. This reinitialization spans two levels of abstraction, as may be demonstrated using the keyboard as an example: 1. The software keyboard for each virtual terminal may be customized independently of all others by a service call (SVC). This RIS control removes any such alterations that may have been made to the terminal's keyboard mapping and restores it to match the global default keyboard. 2. The global default keyboard under which all terminals are initiated is itself virtualized by its reconfigurability. Therefore, this implementation of RIS does not merely reset the terminal's keymap to a statically defined "initial state". Rather, receipt of the RIS control causes a virtual terminal to check for alterations to its private keyboard mapping, and if it is found such alterations have occurred, the terminal will delete its...