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Improved Specimen Preparation for Shallow Junction Spreading Resistance Measurements

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062419D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Halbach, RE: AUTHOR

Abstract

A technique for preparing a field-effect transistor (FET) shallow junction spreading resistance measurement specimen is described. This technique reduces measurement noise, improves measurement starting point resolution, and minimizes early junction point detection errors. A new two-step polishing technique to form a shallow junction spreading resistance specimen 10, as shown in Fig. 1, produces a smooth beveled measurement surface 11. A clear intersection 12 is visible between surfaces 11 and 13. The well-defined intersection 12 results in a more definitive measurement starting point. The initial beveled surface polishing step (rough grind) is done using a rough soda-lime glass surface mounted on a turntable which is rotated slowly.

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Improved Specimen Preparation for Shallow Junction Spreading Resistance Measurements

A technique for preparing a field-effect transistor (FET) shallow junction spreading resistance measurement specimen is described. This technique reduces measurement noise, improves measurement starting point resolution, and minimizes early junction point detection errors. A new two-step polishing technique to form a shallow junction spreading resistance specimen 10, as shown in Fig. 1, produces a smooth beveled measurement surface 11. A clear intersection 12 is visible between surfaces 11 and 13. The well-defined intersection 12 results in a more definitive measurement starting point. The initial beveled surface polishing step (rough grind) is done using a rough soda-lime glass surface mounted on a turntable which is rotated slowly. The specimen, which is mounted on an angle block in a fixture, is brought into contact with the rotating abrasive surface. Methanol is used as a lubricant. The rough grind step removes the bulk of silicon required to form a beveled surface on the specimen. A second (fine polish) step in the beveled surface polishing process utilizes a smooth synthetic quartz plate which is optically flat and is fume etched with hydrofluoric acid to make the surface mildly abrasive. The specimen is lowered onto the rotating and mildly abrasive quartz plate surface, and methanol is used as a lubricant during the fine polish step. The specimen is removed from the fixtur...