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System for Converting Static Test Data Into Clocked Functional Data

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062423D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bula, O: AUTHOR

Abstract

Current test simulators and static testers used on non-LSSD (level sensing scan design) semiconductor chip designs do not provide for functional speed testing of a product which cycles faster than the tester cycle. By converting certain ordered bit configurations found in sequential static test bit patterns into clocked functional data, it becomes possible to do functional speed testing, data reduction, and minimize the number of tester buffer break problems. The logic for detecting and converting sequential static test data patterns which repeat, except for one column or group of columns, into test patterns with embedded pulse control characters can be implemented in hardware or software. An example of the conversion technique is shown in Fig.

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System for Converting Static Test Data Into Clocked Functional Data

Current test simulators and static testers used on non-LSSD (level sensing scan design) semiconductor chip designs do not provide for functional speed testing of a product which cycles faster than the tester cycle. By converting certain ordered bit configurations found in sequential static test bit patterns into clocked functional data, it becomes possible to do functional speed testing, data reduction, and minimize the number of tester buffer break problems. The logic for detecting and converting sequential static test data patterns which repeat, except for one column or group of columns, into test patterns with embedded pulse control characters can be implemented in hardware or software. An example of the conversion technique is shown in Fig. 1 where a series of seven test patterns (55 through 61) is applied to a plurality of tester pins (1 through 9). By comparing three sequential static test patterns and noting only one digit change in any one of the test bit columns, the test sequence is a candidate for data compression. When the seven test patterns shown are examined, it will be noted that test pattern sequence 55, 56 and 57 has a change in column one (pin 1), as does sequence 57, 58 and 59, as does sequence 59, 60 and 61. By substituting the clocked functional character (P) (Fig. 2 truth table) for a 010 test bit sequence found in column one, the seven test statements can be compressed int...