Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Allowing Host Operating System And/Or Application to Inhibit Mouse Input

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062446D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beauregard, GM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The Terminal Mode Processor (TMP) provides a mode that allows application software and/or the UNIX* operating system to suppress mouse input at the terminal sub-system level. Since this mode is application selectable, one application can turn off mouse input without affecting another, which may want mouse movement reports. Entering or exiting this mode is accomplished via a Set Structure Supervisor Call (SVC) using the set Protocol Modes option. When this inhibit mouse input mode is set, the TMP still receives input from the mouse device, but does not report them in virtual interrupts to the host. This mode solves several problems for an application. First, for those applications that do not use mouse movement reports, there is no longer any need to have code to ignore these reports.

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Method for Allowing Host Operating System And/Or Application to Inhibit Mouse Input

The Terminal Mode Processor (TMP) provides a mode that allows application software and/or the UNIX* operating system to suppress mouse input at the terminal sub-system level. Since this mode is application selectable, one application can turn off mouse input without affecting another, which may want mouse movement reports. Entering or exiting this mode is accomplished via a Set Structure Supervisor Call (SVC) using the set Protocol Modes option. When this inhibit mouse input mode is set, the TMP still receives input from the mouse device, but does not report them in virtual interrupts to the host. This mode solves several problems for an application. First, for those applications that do not use mouse movement reports, there is no longer any need to have code to ignore these reports. In addition, there is a performance saving due to removal of the overhead associated with virtual interrupts, which is how mouse reports are sent. Those applications that do wish to use mouse reports now also have the ability to temporarily suspend them. For example, a text editor could allow the user to use the mouse only when editing graphs and not when editing text. This reduces code complexity, as well as improves performance for the application. * Trademark of AT&T Bell Laboratories.

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