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Soft Diacritics in a Virtual Machine Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062462D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Leonard, AG: AUTHOR

Abstract

By making provision in a virtual machine interface to designate any eligible diacritic character as having either a "dead" or "live" state, additional flexibility is achieved in a virtual machine environment. Composite characters are those created using two keystrokes. One keystroke is the diacritic accent, and the second keystroke is an alphabetic character. These diacritics are often called "dead keys" because they are non-escaping. On keyboards and some word processors, it is actually a physical key that is "dead". Any code output coming from that key position will be designated as dead. A scheme has been adopted in a virtual machine environment which may be described as "dead characters" for the non-escaping nature of a code point which is entirely unrelated to where it might happen to be placed on the physical keyboard.

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Soft Diacritics in a Virtual Machine Environment

By making provision in a virtual machine interface to designate any eligible diacritic character as having either a "dead" or "live" state, additional flexibility is achieved in a virtual machine environment. Composite characters are those created using two keystrokes. One keystroke is the diacritic accent, and the second keystroke is an alphabetic character. These diacritics are often called "dead keys" because they are non-escaping. On keyboards and some word processors, it is actually a physical key that is "dead". Any code output coming from that key position will be designated as dead. A scheme has been adopted in a virtual machine environment which may be described as "dead characters" for the non-escaping nature of a code point which is entirely unrelated to where it might happen to be placed on the physical keyboard. This scheme is taken one step further by this invention. Specifically, any code point that is a diacritic which might be considered to be "dead" is not necessarily so. That is, the same (diacritic) code point might appear on the same keyboard any number of times in either its "dead" state or its "live" state. The provision is made in the virtual machine interface to designate any eligible diacritic as "dead" or have it appear as a normal, spacing character. Thus, not only may any point on the physical keyboard be designated as a diacritic code point, but that code point may also operate in a "l...